Dysforgiveness

MUSGRAVE-QGCon-2015-headshotSPEAKER: Seanna Musgrave

ABSTRACT:
At QGCon I will be running a physical game I developed, Dysforgiveness, which
has also been selected for Indiecade’s E3 showcase. Along with the game I’ll give a short presentation about the experience of making it and other physical games.

In Dysforgiveness, Players wear Velcro-attached cards representing various body parts, and must consensually negotiate the transfer of these cards to another players body, before shifting the cards by bodily embracing, pressing, or any other hands-free method of movement. Each persons goal is to get as close to their own ideal body as possible, and to help their friends get their ideal bodies, too. At the end of the game, players compare the body they acquired through playing the game and the card representing their ideal body, and are invited to reflect on how close they came and if they can find peace with where they are.

It requires a challenging amount of intimacy to play, so players should make sure they feel comfortable with the people they are playing with.

The game has rather obvious parallels to transgender experiences, but I also wanted to make a game that plays with the concept of intimacy and awkwardness without being crass or reductively sexual.

More information about the game, along with pictures and video, is available at: http://dysforgiveness.com/

SPEAKER BIO:
I’m a trans woman game developer / software engineer living in Portland Oregon. I’ve developed a wide variety of games, ranging from card/computer/roleplaying/tabletop games, but Dysforgiveness is one of the first physical games I’ve developed.

I’ve developed a couple of games about poverty, such as Imposter, a puzzlescript game, and How To Get Rich Doing What You Love, a twine game. I’ve developed several educational / simulation games, including a VR game about the scale of the universe and a browser-based game based on emergency planning.

I’m extremely interested in the intersection of small games that cover unique, personal subjects, emotional experiences, and innovative approaches to game design.